community

Research Story-telling

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Stories about community research challenges
Stories about community research challenges

If you are thinking about writing on this blog about the issues in your CBPR work, have a look at what others are writing on this topic too.

CBPR has many benefits for the community research endeavour, but acknowledging and sharing our stories about what it is really like for researchers actually doing the research with communities, can help beginner researchers to be better prepared before venturing into CBPR work. Your story might be about a smooth sailing project with no issues at all or a project with issues significant enough to keep you awake at night.

Sometimes it helps to read what others have written about this.
Read the contributions on this blog, some of these might sound familiar? but different?
Read the insightful blogging on the subject by Daniel Reeders on The Research Whisperer blog. Daniel gives a “personal account based on things that went awry” in his work.

Then, you might like to add your story to the collection, along-side other CBPR researchers around the world.

Happy reading!

 

Image: Flickr.com

Some content on this page was disabled on August 13, 2018 as a result of a DMCA takedown notice from 75Central Photography. You can learn more about the DMCA here:

https://en.support.wordpress.com/copyright-and-the-dmca/

How to carry out a successful CBPR partnership

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How to carry out successful CBPR partnerships
How to carry out successful CBPR partnerships

Promoting Healthy Public Policy through Community-Based Participatory Research: Ten Case Studies

Although not new, this report still has relevance for researchers engaged in community based participatory research and their research partners today. The report looks at 10 case studies of different CBPR partnerships in the US, that are focused on changing policy to improve community health.

Practical recommendations for successful partnerships are made on pages 51 to 54.  Read Report …

 

Image: Filipe Cabrera: Flickr.com

Research Story-telling

Posted on Updated on

Stories about community research challenges
Stories about community research challenges

If you are thinking about writing on this blog about the issues in your CBPR work, have a look at what others are writing on this topic too.

CBPR has many benefits for the community research endeavour, but acknowledging and sharing our stories about what it is really like for researchers actually doing the research with communities, can help beginner researchers to be better prepared before venturing into CBPR work. Your story might be about a smooth sailing project with no issues at all or a project with issues significant enough to keep you awake at night.

Sometimes it helps to read what others have written about this.
Read the contributions on this blog, some of these might sound familiar? but different?
Read the insightful blogging on the subject by Daniel Reeders on The Research Whisperer blog. Daniel gives a “personal account based on things that went awry” in his work.

Then, you might like to add your story to the collection, along-side other CBPR researchers around the world.

Happy reading!

 

Image: Flickr.com

Some content on this page was disabled on August 13, 2018 as a result of a DMCA takedown notice from 75Central Photography. You can learn more about the DMCA here:

https://en.support.wordpress.com/copyright-and-the-dmca/

How to carry out a successful CBPR partnership

Posted on Updated on

How to carry out successful CBPR partnerships
How to carry out successful CBPR partnerships

Promoting Healthy Public Policy through Community-Based Participatory Research: Ten Case Studies

Although not new, this report still has relevance for researchers engaged in community based participatory research and their research partners today. The report looks at 10 case studies of different CBPR partnerships in the US, that are focused on changing policy to improve community health.

Practical recommendations for successful partnerships are made on pages 51 to 54.  Read Report …

 

Image: Filipe Cabrera: Flickr.com

Negotiating divergent interests

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Here is another comment from a researcher.  Identifying information has been removed:-

This is very topical for us currently. We are working with a University to teach and inspire students in Community-based and participatory asset mapping, and participatory action research whilst we complete our ethnographies .
Our emphasis on the participatory is welcomed, we feel, but the students have been set a task that involves door-to-door mapping of a survey type. We have stressed the importance of permissions, non-assumed consent, ongoing consent and so forth, and especially working together with villagers to set the strengths, needs and agendas to follow. This may not happen and if it does it may put the students and university in some degree of opposition to state and government drives for the region – something that culturally is not taken lightly by the students.

Our ethical and moral issues concern the integrity of what we are doing together with the people of the area and the interests of the students and university. These may be at odds and we have to negotiate these.

Ethics Review Process

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I would like to share a comment I have received on this topic from a CBPR researcher:-

          I think part of the problem is that ethics committees are generally not very well equiped   with dealing with these kinds of projects when they review them and try to review them within their normal framework (which traditionally has its roots in the biomedical/clinical), which is less than ideal. Work needs to be done to agree what might be an ethical framework for this and other kinds of “engaged” research and then this needs to be transmitted to ethics committees. This kind of work is iterative and the ethical approval process needs to be responsive to that.

Would you agree?  Was the ethical review of your CBPR research satisfactory?